Performing Arts

Curriculum

As teachers of the Performing Arts, we have the responsibility to develop a universal language that embodies one of the highest forms of creativity. We have the privilege of engaging and inspiring pupils to acquire a love of both Music and Drama whilst developing their talent as musicians and actors. Our curriculum will increase their self-confidence, creativity and sense of achievement whilst we retain the highest of expectations with quality of performances, compositions, listening and text based work.

Key Stage 3

We cover a broad Performing Arts at key stage 3 to give pupils the best foundation possible to succeed in their GCSEs and beyond.

Half Term

Half Term 1

Half Term 2

Half Term 3

Half Term 4

Half Term 5

Half Term 6

Y7

Introduction to Drama (Drama)
Bridging the Gap (Music)

Introduction to Drama (Drama)
Instruments of the Orchestra (Music)

Physical Theatre (Drama)
Musical Cycles (Music)

Advanced Skills (Drama)
Stomp! (Music)

Ernie’s Incredible Illucinations (Drama)
Early Music (Music)

Ernie’s Incredible Illucinations (Drama)
Rock Band (Music)

Y8

Time Travel (Drama)
The Blues (Music)

Bullying (Drama)
Programme Music (Music)

Melodrama (Drama)
Hooks and Riffs (Music)

Soaps (Drama)
Ukulele Skills (Music)

Our Day Out (Drama)
Music and Space (Music)

Our Day Out (Drama)
EDM/ Modern Minimalism (Music)

Y9 (For 2020/21 will be following the Music pathway)

The Blues (Music)
Programme Music (Music)
Hooks and Riffs (Music)
Ukulele Skills (Music)
Music and Space (Music)
EDM/ Modern Minimalism (Music)
Pupils are assessed formally twice per year. All assessments model GCSE style questions and pupils will receive a percentage after each assessment. Assessments can contain questions on any of the previous topics from KS3 which means pupils have to be able to recall content from the whole year.

Key Stage 4

Music Exam Board – OCT J536

This qualification is linear. Linear means that students undertake all non-exam assessment (NEA) in the certification year and sit the written exam at the end of the course in year 11.

There are five areas of study:

  • Area of study 1: My Music
  • Area of study 2: The Concerto Through Time
  • Area of study 3: Rhythms of the World
  • Area of study 4: Film Music
  • Area of study 5: Conventions of Pop

What is assessed

How is it assessed

Component 01/02: Integrated portfolio

(Marked by teachers but moderated by OCR)

Students develop their understanding of performance and composition through exploration of their own instrument within styles and genres of their choosing.

They demonstrate their playing skills and abilities by practising and performing a piece musically, accurately and with appropriate interpretation. In the composition element of this component, they demonstrate knowledge of composition techniques, use of musical elements and resources, including specific instrumental and technology techniques.

  • One solo performance on chosen instrument/voice.
  • One free choice composition
  • Maximum mark 60

30% of GCSE

Component 03/04:
Practical component

(Marked by teachers but moderated by OCR)

tudents develop their skills and understanding of performance and composition. The focus of the performance aspect of this component is on the demands of performing with an ensemble.

Students are also required to compose a piece of music appropriate for one of the areas of study in response to a set brief.

  • One ensemble performance on chosen instrument/voice.
  • One composition set to a brief by the exam board.
  • Maximum mark 60

30% of GCSE

Component 5: Listening and Appraising

 (Marked by OCR)

This component focuses on areas of study 2, 3, 4, and 5.

Students demonstrate their knowledge and understanding of musical elements, contexts and language.

  • One 1hr 30 minute exam.
  • Maximum mark 80

40% of GCSE

This qualification is linear. Linear means that students undertake all non-exam assessment (NEA) in the certification year and sit the written exam at the end of the course in year 11.

The subject content details the knowledge, understanding and skills that students are expected to develop throughout the course of study.

The subject content for GCSE Drama is divided into three components:

  1. Understanding drama.
  2. Devising drama.
  3. Texts in practice.

What is assessed

How is it assessed

Component 1

Understanding Drama.

(Marked by teachers but moderated by AQA)

  • Knowledge and understanding of drama and theatre
  • Study of one set play from a choice of six
  • Analysis and evaluation of the work of live theatre makers
  • Written exam: 1 hour and 45 minutes
  • Open book
  • 80 marks
  • 40% of GCSE

Component 2

Devising Drama.

(Marked by teachers but moderated by AQA)

  • Process of creating devised drama
  • Performance of devised drama (students may contribute as performer or designer)
  • Analysis and evaluation of own work
  • Devising log (60 marks)
  • Devised performance (20 marks)
  • 80 marks in total
  • 40% of GCSE

Component 3

Texts in Practice.

(Marked by AQA)

  • Performance of two extracts from one play (students may contribute as performer or designer)

Free choice of play but it must contrast with the set play chosen for Component 1

Performance of Extract 1 (20 marks) and Extract 2 (20 marks)

  • 40 marks in total
  • 20% of GCSE

Home Learning

  • Revising from their knowledge organiser.
  • Creating a graphic score composition.
  • Writing a critique of a piece of music.
  • Learning lines for a performance.

Plus, other tasks relating to the Scheme of Learning being taught.

How can you help?

  1. Make sure your child is reading every night. Reading for pleasure is fundamental to academic success in every subject.
  2. Please encourage your child to listen to music in their own time.
  3. Please encourage discussion about the culture of performance. This could be a favourite actor/actress, musician or dancer.
  4. Test your child on their script work; allow them to test out different accents and intonation with their voices!